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Captive Kings. Created to obtain more wins and less draws with an anti-chess chess rule.[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Fergus Duniho wrote on 2017-09-29 UTC

I was meaning to rewrite the rules to make them clearer. I'll do that here, and you can let me know if these are still accurate.

Apart from differences in the setup, already described above, Captive Kings Chess is played like Chess with these further differences:

1. The object is to move your King to your side of the board. This is accomplished by moving White's King to the fourth rank or Black's King to the fifth.

2. A King may not move to a space on which it would be in check by the rules of Chess, but it may remain on a space on which it would be in check, since there is no real check in this game, and no piece may actually capture the King.

3. Capture is not allowed on a player's first move.

4. The King is not allowed to capture any pieces on the opponent's first rank, this being where each King starts, but it may capture unprotected pieces on other ranks, including Pawns on the second.

This covers what you listed as 2-5. Your #1 is already covered in the setup section, and your #6 does not appear to be a rule. It seems to be an observation that follows from the other rules, not an additional rule of the game. This could be mentioned in another section, such as introduction or notes, but when something is not an actual rule, it can be confusing to list it as one.