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The Chess Variant Pages



This page is written by the game's inventor, Uri Bruck.

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George Duke wrote on 2013-11-18 UTCGood ★★★★
Besides Uri Bruck's attributed 'prophet' from Arabic, Nahbi means in Korean butterfly and also cat or kitty.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nabi.
 Nahbi moves to Knight and Zebra squares as one-path slider. The two Zebra patterns of Nahbi duplicate 2 of the 12 Falcon patterned moves discovered  in 1992.  Also year 1999 Cardinal Super Chess, http://www.chessvariants.org/index/external.php?itemid=CardinalSuperche, by other inventor has piece Cardinal which too duplicates 2 different of the 12 Falcon patterned moves, one-path slider Cardinal going to Betzan-atomic Camel squares.  In both cases, the two patterns to Zebra and two to Camel are mirrot images.  Fundamental Falcon has 6 patterns and their 6 mirror images for the twelve; thus together the two CVs Nahbi and Cardinal Super Chess have 4 of those basic fundamental 12.

 Bruck may or may not have been aware of Korean word Nahbi, insofar as his background at Ackanomic Party Chess -- which uses other longer-range "Nahbi" -- mentions the Arabic but not the Korean. Now interesting coincidence, because of the homonymous finding, is that centuries-old Korean Chess Elephant itself, http://www.chessvariants.org/oriental.dir/koreanchess.html, also goes of course to what CVers call the Zebra squares, just like recent Nahbi.  Korean Elephant is piece-type not the same as Chinese Elephant.  Xiangqi Elephant goes to Alfil destinations numbering only 7 possible points. Korean Chess has both fixed sliders Knight to (1,2) and Elephant to (2,3) and no piece-type Alfil-like.

Korean Elephant goes one orthogonal, followed by two diagonally outwardly. Those two mirrors are not the present Nahbi's  two diagonal same direction followed by one orthogonally. Their "Zebra" destinations are the same but pathways are unique. Korean Elephant two patterns to notional Zebra predate by far another 2 of the 12 Falcon fundamental movement patterns.  Among the three CVs, Korean Chess, Nahbi, and Cardinal are to be seen then 6 of the 12 Falcon movements. Falcon's potential arrivals thus do include both Camel(1,3) and Zebra(2,3), the squares naturally just beyond the Knight, http://www.google.com/patents/US5690334.

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