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Liu Yang. Hexagonal analogue to Yang Qi. (11x11, Cells: 91) [All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
Fergus Duniho wrote on 2016-03-13 UTC
In general, a page providing the rules of a game should contain all information needed to play it. Upon closer examination, Charles made things confusing by renaming most of the pieces from Yang Qi, many of which were in Chess and have been used under their Chess names with the very same moves in McCooey's Hexagonal Chess (and mostly the same in Glinski's). There are straightforward transformations from playing on a board of squares to playing on a board of hexagons, and using the same names for pieces on both boards allow players to more easily remember how pieces move. The GrandDuke, Unicorn, Sling, Sennight, and Broker are not new pieces. They are just the hexagonal King, Bishop, Vao, Knight, and Pawn.